Original Research

Influence of Sepitori on standard Setswana of its home language learners at three Tshwane townships

Valencia K. Wagner, Thabo Ditsele, Mary M. Makgato
Literator | Vol 41, No 1 | a1653 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/lit.v41i1.1653 | © 2020 Valencia K. Wagner, Thabo Ditsele, Mary M. Makgato | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 August 2019 | Published: 12 March 2020

About the author(s)

Valencia K. Wagner, Department of Applied Languages, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
Thabo Ditsele, Department of Applied Languages, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
Mary M. Makgato, Department of Applied Languages, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

This article established how a mixed language spoken as a lingua franca by black residents of Tshwane, known as Sepitori, influenced learners who studied Setswana as a home language at three high schools in GaRankuwa, Mabopane and Soshanguve; all these three townships are located north of Pretoria’s central business district. Data were gathered from 90 learners (30 from each school) and six Setswana educators from the same schools. Learners wrote an essay in Setswana on an interesting and contemporary topic ‘free education for all university students’, while educators were interviewed individually. Data analysis showed that Sepitori significantly influenced the written output of learners. Some educators were adamant that it was unreasonable to wish away Sepitori in Setswana classrooms because learners and many educators (regardless of the subjects they taught) ordinarily spoke Sepitori at the three townships be it at school or at home.

Keywords

home language; standard variety; mixed language; Setswana; Sepitori.

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